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Planets, Planets, Planets!!!

The universe is something SO massive that no matter how much we try or observe, we will never know exactly how many objects of matter and dark matter there are out there. We already know about our Solar System, which revolves around our star, the sun, and the Milky Way Galaxy, a few other galaxies and comets that are out there. That’s common knowledge and can obviously be seen by the naked eye (or when looking through a telescope).

However, the expansion of the universe just seems getting larger and larger–or does it? In 1995 (which is recent in NASA’s standings), astronomers were said to see some Jupiter-sized planets due to their Kepler Satellite. Ever since then, there have been said to be 1,235 potential planets! And hey, that’s just said to be from 1995. It’s 2011 now! Could you imagine the increase in numbers?

It’s clear to see that NASA and scientists are making new discoveries every day. After all, there are new objects approaching us every day. Just because we are first able to see these objects now, doesn’t mean that they weren’t there before. So, what’s so special? It’s said that at some point, the satellite had always pointed to the Milky Way near the Northern Cross constellation. But, the Kepler team leader, William Borucki, at the Ames Research Center in Northern California states that if Kepler could see the whole sky, it would have found 400,000 planets! (Says the article;paragraph 4)

Not only that, but by measuring the light of 156,000 stars and looking at dips, the planets can be validated through telescopes. Of course, that will take years, but could you imagine? It makes a person wonder about what is really out there.

Fifty four Kepler planets are said that they could be seen as another earth. Guess we’ll just have to wait and see once it gets close enough to observe. Who knows? Maybe a new planet is being born as we speak. Not to mention, what about the future? When our sun is gone, will a new solar system be reborn to take its place? And how many planets will there be for us and for us to see–if there is said to even be an ‘us’?

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/07/opinion/07mon4.html?ref=astronomyandastrophysics

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